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The Unsung Hero of Success: in all shapes and sizes

Posted 20 August, 2017 by Surely
in Educate Yourself

What mental images come to your mind when you hear the word success?
A rich, powerful figure?
A brave little boy who rises up against all odds to be the top student?
Or a smiley muscular athlete that enjoys his sports as much as winning?

Success is always associated with winning, getting wealthy and being on top.
However, a narrow definition does not do it justice.
To understand what success truly is, just listen to some of these people.

 

Success comes in different shapes and sizes.

 

“Success is how high you bounce when you hit bottom.”

 

George Patton, a decorated USA army general, rated indomitable spirit above all. The hard-nosed attitude to stand up after every fall was something he valued beyond his brilliant wartime planning and victories over the Axis powers.

 

“I measure success by how many people love me.”

 

Many people think success is earning the most money. The man who has done exactly that says otherwise. This quote from Warren Buffet shows that to have a connection with people and a sense of belonging to the community is something he enjoys more than being a billionaire.

 

“If you carefully consider what you want to be said of you in the funeral experience, you will find your definition of success.”

 

The author of the well-known book The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People said it all.
At a wake, no one will speak of how wealthy or powerful the deceased was.
Instead, people eulogize about how one has touched their lives and made a difference.

 

Never overheard in a funeral: He has earned a total of $3,023,238.

Never overheard in a funeral: He has earned a total of $3,023,238.

 

From all these examples, it is clear that there is no one definition of success.
You do not have to be extremely wealthy or have a hot bod to succeed.
All you have to do is to find a goal to work towards and it will make you satiated when you have completed it.

That is the true success.

 

The path to success is uneven.

 

We acknowledge that there are many different routes to success.
Willpower, opportunities, good timing are some ingredients that may lead to your desired goals.
However, there are also many risks along the way that can torpedo your efforts.

You may wish to be financially independent by an age of 50.
However, an untimely illness will drain your savings, increase your expenditures and even land you into bankruptcy.
Or a retrenchment will result in a long layoff and force you to sell your investment at a loss as you need money to survive.

 

When your bank account is empty, your bank book can be a source of food.

When your bank account is empty, your bank book can be a source of food.

 

In good times, you may feel that these risks are far-fetched.
With recession looming, you have to think twice.
These are painful situations that you have no control over but yet could just happen to you one day.

 

The silent hero that paves your path.

 

When it comes to risk management, there is no better instrument than insurance.
It is a multi-purpose, jack-of-many-trades tool that you can utilise in your daily life, more than just to protect your own life.

>> Read here to find out what other ways you can make full use of insurance <<

Depending on what kind of success you are pursuing, you may find that insurance may smooth your path.
Sometimes it is the tool that may make your dreams possible!

 

Financial fire-fighter

 

Your objective is to be wealthy.
Not just financially independent but to be obscenely rich.
You want to lead an opulent lifestyle, filled with caviar, luxury cars and other excesses.

 

success

You want to have so much money that you run out of places to store them.

 

Having insurance helps in this cause definitely.
You cannot be rich without protecting your wealth from being pillaged by ailments, accidents and disasters.
That incidentally is what insurance does best.

Life insurance helps you to tide through illnesses and accidents.
Health policies buffer your bank account against the frighteningly high medical bills.
And general insurance such as motor and home insurance make sure that your property can be protected from fire, accident and once-in-fifty years flash floods.

 

A Family Helper

 

You are a family-oriented person.
Nothing is more important than keeping your homies together.
Even at the expense of your own life.

How can insurance help you to be a better parent?
By ensuring that when any untoward happen to you, your family will not be financially impacted.

 

Yes, at least you can still afford to have the maid around.

Your family members do not have to go through financial hardship on top of emotional and physical difficulties that may be placed upon your family due to an unexpected injury or illness.

 

The Charity Fund-giver

 

You believe in giving back to the society as you have gained much from the stability that this nation has provided.
Beyond the regular grass-root activities and the volunteer sessions at the orphanage, you want to contribute more.
There are always more to be done to help those who are in need.

You cannot afford much to support the charitable causes that you believe in.
However, you have a life insurance policy which your family does not need.
You can assign the policy or bequest the proceeds to the charity of your choice.
That way you can make a financial contribution after you have passed on.

 

Success finally!

 

Reaching your goals is never easy.
You have to get as much help as you can.
That includes obtaining insurance cover to smooth your path to success.

 

Unsung hero

Short and fat but ever so useful!

 

No matter what you are gunning for in life, life insurance can be that friend that accompanies and supports you along the way.
Don’t forget to bring this unsung hero for the trip of your life!

www.ClearlySurely.com aims to eradicate the knowledge gap between consumers and Life Insurance. Our Vision is that one day, every Man, Woman, and Child will be properly insured.

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