3 bizarre questions to help you make the right life (and insurance) decisions

Posted 13 November, 2016 by Surely
in Educate Yourself

You laid back into the cushy sofa chair, making yourself comfortable.
Closing your eyes for just a second, you could hear the rhythmic clinking of the teaspoon as Sebastian stirred his coffee.
A faint nutty aroma wafted through the air.

You opened your eyes lazily.
“Please go on.”

Sebastian has been introduced by your colleague.
He is not your usual financial planner.
He has a unique psychic ability to see into the future.

He stared intently at you for a good minute.
“You have a husband, Richard. No kid yet.”

You nodded in agreement. Sebastian went on.
“In two years’ time, you will have a son. However, your husband is not the father.
The real dad is your secret lover, Jonathan.”

Returning his glare, you took a sharp intake of breath.
“WHAT? How do you know?!”
Sebastian grinned smugly and continued

“Make sure you take up a large term insurance for your husband.
He will pass away in about four years from now.
For you, smoking will cause you to develop lung cancer in your later years. Buy a critical illness policy”

You wanted to slap him.
At the same time, you felt like running away.
Sebastian seemed right on all counts.

 

Knowing yourself is the beginning of all wisdom.

 

These words from Aristotle still ring true today. More than ever.
In our frenzied modern lives, we are bombarded with a copious amount of information.
Yet, we have so little knowledge about ourselves.

Unless you have a clairvoyant adviser like Sebastian, you have to stop and take stock.
Understanding yourself is a difficult task.
Critiquing others seems so much easier.

We often receive emails from our readers on how and what insurance to buy.
It is impossible to advise.
It may involve having a crystal ball and some special effects around us.

 

Even Obama cannot see the future.

Even Obama cannot see the future.

 

Instead, it will be more fruitful for you to understand yourself and sort it out yourself.
Here are some crazy questions that will be effective for your self-discovery.
Not just for insurance but to your life itself.

 

Who do you want to be a hero to?

 

We have our own favourite superhero.
Superman, Son Goku or even not-even-an-adult Hit Girl.
A little part of us wants to be one ourselves.

Thankfully, all of us can be heroes.
Just not super ones.

 

Maybe you are already one to your kid.

Maybe you are already one to your kid.

 

Being a hero does not entail us being around all the time.
It is kinda creepy to stalk someone 24/7 so that you can be a hero.
A present-day hero supports other to chase their dreams, without being omnipresent.

Behind every successful man, stands a woman.
The vice versa is true.
And you can be a hero or heroine to your own child.

You want to take care of your aged parents so that they can complete their bucket list.
Feel ever so strongly about helping an orphanage?
It is possible to be a hero to all of the above.

With insurance, you can protect those who matter.
You can build a wall to keep those pesky Mexicans out!

Oops..  sorry that was my inner Trump speaking.
What I meant was that you may erect a financial breakwater to help you cope with the unexpected life’s tidal waves.

Guess what?
You can be a hero to yourself too.

 

 

 

What makes you go absolutely bonkers? (when you do not have it)

 

I am talking about going batshit crazy.
The feeling that you feel like punching someone’s face in.

 

Or punches. Whatever that rocks your boat.

Or punches. Whatever that rocks your boat.

 

For some, it is the car.
Taking the public transport is a no-no.
It may make one so crazy that he may want to sabotage the train signals.

Introverts like myself will list down our house.
Our home is our personal sanctuary.
Without it, we cannot rest our weary souls and recharge ourselves.

We all have a colleague that cannot function without coffee.
They will come to office with disheveled hair and lifeless bodies.
You know that they have had their fix when you hear the clacking of their keyboards.

Some of these things are irreplaceable.
For everything else, there is insurance.

 

What do you want to hear at your own funeral?

 

Imagine this.
Your soul is trapped inside your physical body even when your heart stops beating.
Your cadaver is placed at a funeral parlour or under your void deck like a typical Chinese wake.

All you can do is listen.
You hear your wife sobbing.
Your kids are asking her where you are.

The irritating neighbours are here.
Your rarely-seen third cousin from far-away lands of Jurong West pays you the last respects.
Everyone is here.

 

And your buddies doing what they do best at wakes.

And your buddies doing what they do best at wakes.

 

At this point, do you want to listen to nice eulogies about the great YOU?
Or do you wish to hear about your family members worrying about losing the house?
That your barely adolescent son has to take on a job to support the family?

This bizarre question can set you thinking about your financial plans seriously.
The sense of helplessness will motivate you to make your insurance plans with more urgency.

You realize that lives of others carry on after your demise
You have to do something before it is too late.

 

Conclusion

 

Often, you are told that you need the help of others.
You have to understand yourself through others.
Preferably a bank representative or an insurance agent.
It is not entirely wrong.

However, it is important to self-evaluate first.
A doctor can only prescribe the right medicine if you inform her about your allergies.
In the same vein, a financial planner can only help you if you understand who you are and what things are truly precious to you.

As weird as these questions may be, they are critical in understanding yourself.
Do you have other life questions to share with us?
Share them with us in the comments

www.ClearlySurely.com aims to eradicate the knowledge gap between consumers and Life Insurance. Our Vision is that one day, every Man, Woman, and Child will be properly insured.

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